What is the Full Form of SIEM?

SIEM Stands for Security Information and Event Management

Introduction

Information security is a growing concern for businesses of all sizes. In the past, IT departments were responsible for the maintenance and protection of corporate networks. But now, in an age where many employees are mobile workers who access company resources from outside the office setting, IT staff must also provide end-to-end security that safeguards data no matter where it’s accessed or stored. One solution to this problem is Security Information and Event Management (SIEM).

About SIEM

Security information and event management or SIEM is a software application that monitors an organization’s network resources. It aggregates data from various sources like firewalls, intrusion detection systems (IDSs), antivirus scanners, Web servers, and more to identify suspicious activity on the company’s networks.

What does a SIEM do?

A network-based intrusion detection system (NIDS) monitors specific traffic on your corporate network, looking for potential threats that may be attached to the information being sent over it. A SIEM usually covers more than just protection against external attacks – its data-gathering capabilities allow an organization to monitor their own internal behaviors too, which can help identify security risks before they become critical problems. Monitoring and analyzing these alerts in real-time helps businesses maintain the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of their systems.

What should be monitored?

In order to understand what needs monitoring in your environment, it is important to first define one of two categories: assets such as people or computers which may have sensitive information at risk; or operational aspects like building access control where security breaches could cause loss of profit through theft. Assets are typically secured by physical protection mechanisms while operational aspects are usually protected by logical controls – devices with passwords that can be disabled remotely if lost or stolen.

Difference between SIEM and NIDS

A network-based intrusion detection system or a NIDS monitors specific traffic on your corporate network, looking for potential threats that may be attached to the information being sent over it. This type of device can often detect intrusions using signatures, heuristic analysis of abnormal (or suspicious) behavior patterns, or other features such as protocol anomaly detection. A SIEM usually covers more than just protection against external attacks – its data-gathering capabilities allow an organization to monitor their own internal behaviors too, which can help identify security risks before they become critical problems.

Needs for SIEM in a Company

If you are interested in knowing what exactly should be monitored in your environment, it is important to first define what falls into one of two categories: assets or operational aspects. Assets are typically secured by physical protection mechanisms while operational aspects are usually protected by logical controls – devices with passwords that can be disabled remotely if lost or stolen.

Some examples of SIEM software

Some examples of SIEM software include: ArcSight, CipherCloud, LogRhythm, QRadar, Splunk, and LogEntries.

Benefits of SIEM

  • Some benefits of a SIEM software system include the ability to analyze all events in one centralized location.
  • Provides more than just a reactive security tool for detecting threats after they happen.
  • Helps increase visibility into what’s happening on your network at any given time.

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